What Would You Train People to Believe?

S

SimpleIsGood

#1
If had the freedom and resources to train everyone on SOMETHING quality related, what would you do?

  • Would you teach a tool, an approach, or a philosophy?
  • Would you teach people about "closing the loop," or 5S or PDCA?
  • What fundamental quality skills, attitudes or approaches would you want for everyone on your production/service team?
Thanks.
 
#2
I'll open with a simple set.

Inspection is not how you obtain quality, and when something is found defective, it is not that way because "the inspector didn't catch it".
 
W

Wilderness Woody

#3
I would start with PDCA basics. Pound P P P P of Planning into their brains until it sinks in, then finally allow them to Do something, go back and make them Check what they've done and think about what Actions come next.
 
#5
No mystery about my primary teaching: Deming's System of Profound Knowledge (SoPK) - the more an employee knows about the Big Picture and how his role contributes to the success of the whole, the more likely the employee will seek out more knowledge eagerly instead of being force-fed bit by bit.

Companies with bosses who want to "program" employees like industrial robots aren't very happy places to work.

Even though I am notorious for writing long posts, the concept of the utopic SoPK (like Utopia) versus the dystopic silos (like the world of "Hunger Games") really needs an essay-length message much longer than is acceptable here in the Cove.
 
L

lk2012

#6
I'd start them on the simple things like - the more errors you can eliminate from the start using as much of the experience and talent everyone's got, the easier your job will be. Work smarter, not longer hours!
 

John Broomfield

Staff member
Super Moderator
#7
Do not forget also to teach what must be unlearned and why, such as believing quality products and services must cost more than products and services that fail to fulfill customer requirements.
 
S

SimpleIsGood

#8
From THE Source of Infallible Knowledge (Wikipedia)


The Deming System of Profound Knowledge

Deming advocated that all managers need to have what he called a System of Profound Knowledge, consisting of four parts:
  1. Appreciation of a system: understanding the overall processes involving suppliers, producers, and customers (or recipients) of goods and services;
  2. Knowledge of variation: the range and causes of variation in quality, and use of statistical sampling in measurements;
  3. Theory of knowledge: the concepts explaining knowledge and the limits of what can be known.
  4. Knowledge of psychology: concepts of human nature.
"The various segments of the system of profound knowledge proposed here cannot be separated. They interact with each other. Thus, knowledge of psychology is incomplete without knowledge of variation."
Okay. Good. But kind of vague to apply as is. Is there a good book (maybe a booklet) on this subject?
 

Miner

Forum Moderator
Staff member
Admin
#9
From THE Source of Infallible Knowledge (Wikipedia)


The Deming System of Profound Knowledge

Deming advocated that all managers need to have what he called a System of Profound Knowledge, consisting of four parts:
  1. Appreciation of a system: understanding the overall processes involving suppliers, producers, and customers (or recipients) of goods and services;
  2. Knowledge of variation: the range and causes of variation in quality, and use of statistical sampling in measurements;
  3. Theory of knowledge: the concepts explaining knowledge and the limits of what can be known.
  4. Knowledge of psychology: concepts of human nature.
"The various segments of the system of profound knowledge proposed here cannot be separated. They interact with each other. Thus, knowledge of psychology is incomplete without knowledge of variation."
Okay. Good. But kind of vague to apply as is. Is there a good book (maybe a booklet) on this subject?
The attached document is not my work, but something I came across several years ago. The original author culled some nuggets from various Deming publications that illustrate his intent.
 

Attachments

#10
From THE Source of Infallible Knowledge (Wikipedia)


The Deming System of Profound Knowledge

Deming advocated that all managers need to have what he called a System of Profound Knowledge, consisting of four parts:
  1. Appreciation of a system: understanding the overall processes involving suppliers, producers, and customers (or recipients) of goods and services;
  2. Knowledge of variation: the range and causes of variation in quality, and use of statistical sampling in measurements;
  3. Theory of knowledge: the concepts explaining knowledge and the limits of what can be known.
  4. Knowledge of psychology: concepts of human nature.
"The various segments of the system of profound knowledge proposed here cannot be separated. They interact with each other. Thus, knowledge of psychology is incomplete without knowledge of variation."
Okay. Good. But kind of vague to apply as is. Is there a good book (maybe a booklet) on this subject?
You can find a "quick and dirty" thumbnail synopsis of each of the four points here (https://www.deming.org/theman/theories/profoundknowledge)

A hint at the way I (and most other Demingites) view SoPK as a "universal truth" is contained in this brief essay by a Johns Hopkins professor which applies the concept to education. (http://education.jhu.edu/PD/newhorizons/Transforming%20Education/Articles/The%20Profound%20Knowledge%20School/)

If you still seek more, read through this old thread (http://elsmar.com/Forums/showthread.php?p=70108#post70108)

Then, if you want still more, start a new thread about your SoPK questions in the Philosophy forum and we Demingites will come out of the woodwork to join in.
 
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