Interesting Discussion When Employees Don't Follow Procedures

Jen Kirley

Quality and Auditing Expert
Leader
Admin
Wouldn't it be a shame if you lost good workers because simple rebellion wasn't the real problem? All of those trained employees would be out the door and must be replaced, tsk tsk. Very expensive! And your company's secrets, if you had any, went with them. Surely there is a better way of dealing with resistance!

This article is number 4 in the Stealth Quality Series.

I had already promised Arresting Absenteeism would be number 3, but have not written that yet as this subject surfaced recently and seemed to need a good airing. I'll start on absenteeism soon. Thanks for your patience--be well!
 

Attachments

  • Following Procedures.doc
    138.5 KB · Views: 1,168
Last edited:
A

AllanJ

With this particular submission, Ms Kirley has produced a nicely researched and well presented paper that helps to raise the tone of the Reading Room towards that which would befit a learned institution. It is to be hoped Covers will take this to their employers' personnel departments (a.k.a. HR) and senior management for consideration.

I offer her my congratulations.
 
R

Rob Nix

Very nicely done, Jennifer! :applause:

Hmmm: It is interesting, though, that of the 4 articles, the third one - on absenteeism - is absent. :rolleyes:
 
Q

qualitygoddess - 2010

Jennifer:

A wonderful article! I plan to pass this one along to a colleague dealing with an "allergic" employee, who will most likely be classified more expertly after reading this article.

Keep those articles coming!!

--QG

:agree1:
 

Jen Kirley

Quality and Auditing Expert
Leader
Admin
These are certainly very kind remarks! Thank you. :eek: Now you know why it took me all weekend to write the thing...

Until then, ah yes, Arresting Absenteeism is absent--sigh. You know what they say: "Don't quit yer day job!" Until I get paid for writing this way it has to happen in my off time.
 
C

Craig H.

Jennifer Kirley said:
These are certainly very kind remarks! Thank you. :eek: Now you know why it took me all weekend to write the thing...

Until then, ah yes, Arresting Absenteeism is absent--sigh. You know what they say: "Don't quit yer day job!" Until I get paid for writing this way it has to happen in my off time.


Jennifer - excellent article!

If you keep this up you might not be at the day job much longer...

Although the title does not state it, many of the topics covered in this paper are related to absenteeism as well, no? I wonder who has done a study that documents the effect of the end of the honeymoon with increased absenteeism?

Again, very nice job! Thanks!
 
Q

qualeety

thank you, jennifer

thanks for your wonderful article.....i forwarded your article to our HR....will let you know you know if there any feedback from them......but i won't hold my breath..... :(
 
B

Barbara B

Great Job!

Jennifer,

:applause: Your article is really a great source of inspiration for root causes in the case employees do not work like they are supposed to :thanks:

Barbara
 

Tim Folkerts

Trusted Information Resource
Jennifer,

Good job gathering, organizing and presenting thoughts about employee performance & motivation. The world in general -- and the quality profession in specific -- need more people thinking at the level of "profound knowledge" rather than thinking at the level of "profound memorization" or "profound regurgitation".


Tim F
 

Jen Kirley

Quality and Auditing Expert
Leader
Admin
Craig H. said:
Jennifer - excellent article!

If you keep this up you might not be at the day job much longer...

Although the title does not state it, many of the topics covered in this paper are related to absenteeism as well, no? I wonder who has done a study that documents the effect of the end of the honeymoon with increased absenteeism?

Again, very nice job! Thanks!
Too kind, everyone, thanks again.

I can't promise consistent scorchers, but if I keep cranking these out I will eventually compile them and ask around about agents or publishing editors. :tg:

Craig, it is very interesting in that the past year my day job has been in special education: grossly underpaid but my mind is always turning and connecting the dots. I am looking at these people, and their "normal" peers as not-too-distant employees and I am thinking they are not well understood.

Nor ar they easy to understand. They are still children, of course. most will eventually get zapped by "the reality rod" but for now they are quite a bunch of...oh my... was I ever like that? Oh dear...

Lots of budding narcissists are coming up the ranks. Watch out for those.

Also, the sheer numbers of special ed are mind blowing. 25% of my (middle) school is in the special ed program. And no one says a word of this when gnashing about how X number of graduates are functionally illiterate. Indeed--I understand up to 20% of adults are functionally illiterate. This is news?

So it seems important to talk about it in a way that makes them people, with gifts and challenges--sometimes the challenge also brings a brilliant gift. Many people go undiagnosed but struggle to keep up; and people think "So-and-so's just a slacker." Maybe not.

I just want to ensure people are all allowed the opportunity to contribute as much as they want to, and are able to. As a society it is in our interest to maximize everyone's possible contribution.

Yes, absenteeism is going to play in on some of this--but more often I think it will be connected to personal problems like financial worries and childrens' sickness or daycare problems. Stay tuned...

Be well!
 
Top Bottom