Can YOU help? --> Unanswered questions <-- (Other than Marcelo's Informational posts)

Where does the Lean Manufacturing philosophy / tool set come from?

#11
Thanks for sharing this. I was impressed by the notes for each slide, which lead me to believe there is an intelligent presentation to go with these excellent slides!
 
S

S Johnson

#12
I was in a similar spot as you not that long ago. I took a class which taught me the tools and how they were beneficial, but I didn't REALLY understand Lean until I read "The Toyota Way" by Jeffrey Liker. The internet can give you an outline of what it is, but since I've read this book, I understand it far better. Understand the philosophy of Toyota and you will understand Lean. It all made perfect sense after I read it.
 
G

Gilberto - 2009

#13
Help Please?

I am a new quality auditor and have spent the past few years learning that role. My organisation is starting a 'lean programme' and I have to confess to knowing very little about it. Could someone please provide some basic background knowledge on this tool? Where does it come from? What it is used for? How it operates? When auditing this function, what to look for?

Your advice and knowledge are very welcome.

Thank you and Regards,

Andy:confused:

He Andre...

The Lean system, certainly is a work philosophy, where it is revolutionizing of the world !
To implant a Lean system, good and efficient it must have two tools/philosophies very spread out well and functioning as inside of its company, them Just in Time and Jindoka, these two are the Hart of the Lean system.

Do you Have knowledge of these two tools/philosophies and are well functioning in its company?
 
D

duecesevenOS - 2009

#14
Here is a .ppt on Lean.
I just went through your presentation and I though it was very good (I know it's an old post but....) Anyone can answer this for me.

I'm curious about the kanban definitions. I've never read anything on a "non-replenishable" kanban. What is the purpose of having a kanban that doesn't signal you into any action? I can't think of any reason to put together a signal that says we just ran out of this one time use item but don't do anything about it? Am I not understanding this slide or what (#13)?
 
G

Gilberto - 2009

#15
I just went through your presentation and I though it was very good (I know it's an old post but....) Anyone can answer this for me.

I'm curious about the kanban definitions. I've never read anything on a "non-replenishable" kanban. What is the purpose of having a kanban that doesn't signal you into any action? I can't think of any reason to put together a signal that says we just ran out of this one time use item but don't do anything about it? Am I not understanding this slide or what (#13)?

I don´t understand this question/doubt?
 
D

duecesevenOS - 2009

#16
I just want an example of when you would use a non-replenishable kanban. Kanban's are signals so what does a non-replenishable kanban signal?

Maybe a better explanation is what I need.
 
G

Gilberto - 2009

#17
I just want an example of when you would use a non-replenishable kanban. Kanban's are signals so what does a non-replenishable kanban signal?

Maybe a better explanation is what I need.
KAMBAM is much more that mapping or single-piece production. The mentality is a change for the business single-piece production in the Company or a Flow of consistent value.
 
D

duecesevenOS - 2009

#18
I do know what a "kanban" is.

I am referring to the powerpoint presentation that Frank T. posted and slide #13 in particular. In the presentation he describes different types of kanbans that are out there and I recognized all of them except for one. I've never heard of a "non-replenishable kanban" and I was curious how it would be useful.
 
G

Gilberto - 2009

#19
I do know what a "kanban" is.

I am referring to the powerpoint presentation that Frank T. posted and slide #13 in particular. In the presentation he describes different types of kanbans that are out there and I recognized all of them except for one. I've never heard of a "non-replenishable kanban" and I was curious how it would be useful.
In this in case that it is more viable to say that the Kanbam is not applicable, this occurs in cases where if insumo X uses one, only for that customer X, where if purchase with stated periods not determined.

Cases exist where the Kanbam is not the best tool to apply itself, in these cases lead would indicate one bigger teams for the product, stipulating the stated period of the supplier and process until the end product.
 
W

wmarhel

#20
Kanban, regardless of the method or what it looks like, is simply a mechanism to signal production of a specific part at a specific quantity. It is used to facilitate flow where it couldn't otherwise be achieved. This could be due to the inability to stabilize the cycle times of the various operations, or because the processes are not connected. Think of a customer with their supplier across town, or a milling machine supplying parts to an assembly line on the other side of a 300,000 sq. ft. manufacturing facility.

The production scenarios (from best to worst) are:

1) Flow
2) FIFO Flow
3) Kanban
4) Batch

I can't remember which book/s cited (I'd have to look it up) the practice of "single-use kanban" or "one-time kanban" but if I remember correctly there are two reasons for the use of it:

1) Repetitive orders which have either a long frequency between orders and/or a low order quantity.

2) As a necessary mechanism due to a extreme and unexpected spike in production. I have used this concept in a seasonal environment.

Either way, once the parts are produced and delivered to the required delivery point, the kanban is destroyed or removed from the process.

Wayne
 

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