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Where does the Lean Manufacturing philosophy / tool set come from?

G

gszekely

#21
KANBAN
REPLENISHABLE OR NOT ?
-REPLENISHABLE.
§ Self-Managing, Simple Visual Signals.
§ Frequent Demands.
§ Supported with Calculations.
§ Surfaces and Materials Investment.
-NON-REPLENISHABLE.
§ Infrequent Demands. – With Spikes.
§ High Value justifies Elegant Management.
§ As Complement to Replenishable Kanban to Satisfy an
Abnormal Demand.
§ Temporary Increase of the Daily Rate.
§ Do you estimate the Impact of Daily Change ?
Example:
PLANT A
QTY : 25
ASPIRATION VALVE
18230965-015
PULL FROM : STORE A1

DELIVER TO :LA-OP12
18230829-015
NON-REPLENISHABLE


Does this help ?
BR
György
 
G

Gilberto - 2009

#22
Kanban, regardless of the method or what it looks like, is simply a mechanism to signal production of a specific part at a specific quantity. It is used to facilitate flow where it couldn't otherwise be achieved. This could be due to the inability to stabilize the cycle times of the various operations, or because the processes are not connected. Think of a customer with their supplier across town, or a milling machine supplying parts to an assembly line on the other side of a 300,000 sq. ft. manufacturing facility.

The production scenarios (from best to worst) are:

1) Flow
2) FIFO Flow
3) Kanban
4) Batch

I can't remember which book/s cited (I'd have to look it up) the practice of "single-use kanban" or "one-time kanban" but if I remember correctly there are two reasons for the use of it:

1) Repetitive orders which have either a long frequency between orders and/or a low order quantity.

2) As a necessary mechanism due to a extreme and unexpected spike in production. I have used this concept in a seasonal environment.

Either way, once the parts are produced and delivered to the required delivery point, the kanban is destroyed or removed from the process.

Wayne

Ok. Excellent
It explained in the practical one what I wanted to say in the theory.:applause:
 
D

duecesevenOS - 2009

#23
Kanban, regardless of the method or what it looks like, is simply a mechanism to signal production of a specific part at a specific quantity. It is used to facilitate flow where it couldn't otherwise be achieved. This could be due to the inability to stabilize the cycle times of the various operations, or because the processes are not connected. Think of a customer with their supplier across town, or a milling machine supplying parts to an assembly line on the other side of a 300,000 sq. ft. manufacturing facility.

The production scenarios (from best to worst) are:

1) Flow
2) FIFO Flow
3) Kanban
4) Batch

I can't remember which book/s cited (I'd have to look it up) the practice of "single-use kanban" or "one-time kanban" but if I remember correctly there are two reasons for the use of it:

1) Repetitive orders which have either a long frequency between orders and/or a low order quantity.

2) As a necessary mechanism due to a extreme and unexpected spike in production. I have used this concept in a seasonal environment.

Either way, once the parts are produced and delivered to the required delivery point, the kanban is destroyed or removed from the process.

Wayne
Thank you Wayne,

I think I understand the application. It's basically a temporary signal to flow abnormalities. I've never heard this type of kanban described but I think we use it none the less:

The process has one customer that has a fluctuating takt time (they are still stuck on a batch process). When the customer of this particular process doesn't meet weekly demand, they occassionally run an extra half day. When the supplier knows that their customer will be running an extra day, they create a temporary kanban (non-replenishing) that is filled so that the customer can run without the supplier present. After the supplier empties the non-replenishing kanban, it is removed and not resupplied.

So basically the customer let's the supplier know of an unusual demand (signal/kanban) and the supplier fills the demand.

Thanks again.
 
B

branham91

#24
You need to read a book called "The Goal". Forgot who wrote it but it is a cheap paperback book. Lean Manufacturing came from Toyota. The head honcho there was grocery shopping one day and marveled at the way inventory was restocked on the shelves. Thus Lean Mfg was born. Basically you have just enough inventory to keep your lines running "Eliminating storage and warehousing". Lean MFG will uncover your process problems because excess inventory hides them. That is the core of lean. Also lean manufacturing means " taking a job that requires 5 people and making due with four" gotta go problem just came up.
 
W

wmarhel

#25
You need to read a book called "The Goal". Forgot who wrote it but it is a cheap paperback book. Lean Manufacturing came from Toyota. The head honcho there was grocery shopping one day and marveled at the way inventory was restocked on the shelves. Thus Lean Mfg was born. Basically you have just enough inventory to keep your lines running "Eliminating storage and warehousing". Lean MFG will uncover your process problems because excess inventory hides them. That is the core of lean. Also lean manufacturing means " taking a job that requires 5 people and making due with four" gotta go problem just came up.
The author of the "The Goal" is Eliyahu M. Goldratt.

I would argue that "Lean Manufacturing" is a bastardized version of what Toyota did/does. "Lean Manufacturing" makes for a good catch-phrase.

Lean Manufacturing wasn't born out of the grocery store, it makes for a good story, but that is incomplete. The supermarket provided the spark for the concept of JIT (Just-in-Time). JIT is just one of the two pillars that the The Toyota Production System is built upon.

Ohno is largely credited with the material flow/JIT aspect of the Toyota system, but Shigeo Shingo was really the thought leader behind the rest. Keep in mind that Ohno himself believed calling it a production system was incorrect. He believed it should have been called the Toyota Management System.

Kanban isn't about quantity, it is about time. It is about the time necessary to replenish the kanban, and the length of time that the kanban will last based on the production levels. The inventory levels are what is necessary to satisfy the customer, and satisfying the customer is the ultimate goal. Eliminating inventory and warehousing is a great concept, like zero-defects, but the purpose is to minimize the amount required. The entire system really is about methods to minimize time, quantities are not the first priority.

The core of Lean is about waste, in any shape or form, not about inventory or headcount reduction. Where Lean most often fails is that it doesn't look at the long term strategic view, which Toyota did in their development of TPS over the decades. More often than not, Lean is trained as a bunch of discrete tools that one can hammer into place when needed. It doesn't work that way, which is probably the biggest reason so few companies have come close to being able to operate like Toyota.

Wayne
 

Steve Prevette

Deming Disciple
Staff member
Super Moderator
#26
The author of the "The Goal" is Eliyahu M. Goldratt.
The Goal is a great book, but I have seen people attribute too much to it. It is the source of the Theory of Constraints, which works well with systems thinking and with lean. I was introduced to it back in the Reengineering frenzy by a consultant who claimed if I read it, I'd become a believer in numerical goals and targets. I read it, I liked it, I didn't become a believer in numerical goals.
 
W

wmarhel

#27
The Goal is a great book, but I have seen people attribute too much to it.

I'm going to agree with you Steve. It was a good book to get people thinking in a different vein.

From the theory of constraints standpoints, H. William Dettmer's books were very informative.

Wayne
 
#28
For Lean I would reccomend the part in the ASQ Six sigma BOK that was mentioned before.

My reccomendation also is that for Lean to work you must base it on a robust 5S program. You may think is the most simple but it is the most important part. If you don't have order you don't have the basics to install all the other principles as kanban, work flow, jit, etc, etc.
 
W

wmarhel

#29
My reccomendation also is that for Lean to work you must base it on a robust 5S program. You may think is the most simple but it is the most important part. If you don't have order you don't have the basics to install all the other principles as kanban, work flow, jit, etc, etc.
I agree that 5S is extremely important, but it isn't a "program". It is just the way you should operate on a daily basis, as are all the other component of TPS. They really are ways to "manage" the business, versus the typical thinking of "we can fix this with that".

From a systems perspective, 5S is just one of the foundational building blocks. I think your last sentence is on the mark though.

Wayne
 


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