X-ray's light testing - What is the standard to test the X-ray light brightness?

MIREGMGR

Inactive Registered Visitor
#4
Re: X-ray's light testing

Is this inquiry about scanning electron microscopes (SEMs)? The posted link provides calibration resources for SEMs.

If the question instead was about medical-diagnostic Xray equipment, are calibration instruments for SEMs considered acceptable for medical-equipment calibration? The technology is very different, and I'm under the impression that the instrument-calibration-chain requirements for medical calibration are rigorous.

It would help if the original poster could more fully explain what equipment and application they're asking about.
 
#8
hI mateS,

Oops... misleading information given! ...

actually I am looking for the testing relevant to X-ray scanner's light testing BUT NOT the X-ray radiation. Is there any testing or specification for that light as specified in any national or international requirements?

Anyone there can help me??

looking forward.....

:thanx:
Tiffany ;0)
 

MIREGMGR

Inactive Registered Visitor
#10
Regarding national requirements in the US market...FDA 21 CFR 1020.31(d)(2) says:

(ii) When a light localizer is used to define the x-ray field, it shall provide an average illuminance of not less than 160 lux (15 footcandles) at 100 cm or at the maximum SID, whichever is less. The average illuminance shall be based on measurements made in the approximate center of each quadrant of the light field. Radiation therapy simulation systems are exempt from this requirement.
(iii) The edge of the light field at 100 cm or at the maximum SID, whichever is less, shall have a contrast ratio, corrected for ambient lighting, of not less than 4 in the case of beam-limiting devices designed for use on stationary equipment, and a contrast ratio of not less than 3 in the case of beam-limiting devices designed for use on mobile and portable equipment. The contrast ratio is defined as I1/I2, where I1 is the illuminance 3 mm from the edge of the light field toward the center of the field; and I2 is the illuminance 3 mm from the edge of the light field away from the center of the field. Compliance shall be determined with a measuring aperture of 1 mm.
Measurement of illuminance in lux or footcandles is a mature technology for which techniques are standardized, measurement laboratory service providers are broadly available, and laboratory instruments and corresponding calibration services are readily available.

As far as I know, the FDA has no other guidance or regulation specifically addressing guide lights. I think Form 3627 is in effect the report form for a product filing to demonstrate compliance with 21 CFR 1020.31 per above.
 

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