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  Customer Satisfaction Measures?

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Author Topic:   Customer Satisfaction Measures?
Steven Sulkin
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posted 06 November 1998 12:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Steven Sulkin   Click Here to Email Steven Sulkin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Wanted to see what you guys have come up with to measure Customer Satisfaction.

We currently look at returned goods and customer complaints. Do most of you use surveys or are we pretty much on the mark?

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Christian Lupo
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posted 06 November 1998 02:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Christian Lupo   Click Here to Email Christian Lupo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Those are good measures of customer dissatisfaction, but not good indicators of satisfaction.

Customer satisfaction can be determined through periodic surveys, documented visits to the customer, or customer satisfaction reports. As part of "subcontractor development" QS registered companies will send you customer satidfaction, on time delivery, or PPM reports.

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Steven Sulkin
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posted 06 November 1998 02:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Steven Sulkin   Click Here to Email Steven Sulkin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I would like to understand more about these reports. Are we going to have to do reports to our suppliers or is this just a first tier thing?

We have an online contact report program. Your suggesting that that might work? How would you go about using that data? It seems like it would be heck looking for trends and such?!?

FYI-We are pursuing QS9000 because of the fit with our quality system. Very few of our customers are QS9000 certified. We do get audited regularly though. I guess that would still be more indicative of dissatisfaction.

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Bill Smith
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posted 06 November 1998 03:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Bill Smith   Click Here to Email Bill Smith     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
We use a Management review process based of of FORD's Quality Operating System (QOS) requirements. We also survey our customers for their expectations.

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Steven Sulkin
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posted 06 November 1998 03:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Steven Sulkin   Click Here to Email Steven Sulkin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I did not find a description of the Quality Operating System in the Quality System Requirements manual. Can you tell me the essentials?

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Marc Smith
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posted 06 November 1998 04:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Marc Smith   Click Here to Email Marc Smith     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Posted for Dan:

-----snippo-----

Subject: Measuring Customer Satisfaction
Date: Fri, 06 Nov 1998 13:38:55 -0500
From: "Dan Indish"
To: sulkinsf@tsmd.com
CC: bbs@Elsmar.com

Steven -

Start measuring Customer Satisfaction from the financial end. Check out such metrics as DSO (Days Sales Outstanding - i.e. the typical time to collect from Customers) and Accounts Receivables Numbers. These financials cost the company money and are what management listens to. When managers realize how much money is going down the drain, then they will authorize surveys, and personal phone calls, etc.

We use mail-in surveys, phone calls, management visits and web site complaints also.

Dan Indish

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Bill Smith
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posted 09 November 1998 10:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Bill Smith   Click Here to Email Bill Smith     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Steve:

The QOS methodology is mentioned in the Ford specific section of the QSR. It is Ford's way of mandating a standardized management review process. It calls for the use of the 8D problem solving tool and also the use of standardized reproting tools such as trend charts, Paynter charts etc.
You can get copies of the QOS primer directly from Ford.

Ford Motor Quality Publications
c/o edcor Data Services
P.O Box 9079
Farmington Hills, MI 48333-9079
Phone : 810-626-3077

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Marc Smith
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posted 09 November 1998 10:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Marc Smith   Click Here to Email Marc Smith     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I believe the phone number for FORD's Edcor data services is now 248 836-1397

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Marc Smith
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posted 13 June 1999 04:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Marc Smith   Click Here to Email Marc Smith     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Some rejuvenation to the topic:

Subject: Re: Q: Measuring Customer Satisfaction /Perry/Naish
Date: Fri, 28 May 1999 10:15:19 -0600
From: ISO Standards Discussion

From: PNaish@aol.com
Subject: Re: Q: Measuring Customer Satisfaction /Perry/Naish

Customer satisfaction and customer feed back has and still is hard to be successful if you truly want the opinions of those that you service.

Of late, and not because of any ISO requirement, I have seen more and more businesses and business segments trying to capture that information.

If you travel you will see more hotels and motels trying to find out how your stay was. They leave a card in your room or on your bed. Only a couple of years ago even finding one in the drawer was a surprise. One of the best hotels we have been in recently was a Ramada Inn outside Washington D.C. in Carollton. They had a card that they gave you in your hand when you checked in. They asked us to please take the time during our stay and let them know how they were doing. In addition they asked when we checked out if there was any problem or anything they could do better. The card was a somewhat standard card with a scoring from 0 - 10 in most categories and room to write in something extra.

Cards are beginning to come in almost every major purchase we make these days. The problem with them is getting a representative response. Most people don't take the time to fill them out unless they are frustrated or they had an outstanding stay. (Or they are quality people like us and know the value they hold for the service or goods provider).

Not to get on my soap box here, but think about those cards and forms the next time someone gives you one. If you want to get them then you also need to fill them out for others. Also think about the ones you do fill out and why you were more likely to do one form or another.

And what about calling the customer? Have you seen the ad on TV about the reporter asking the man who sold an ice cream to his child if he ever went back and asked if the child was satisfied. The same ad shows them asking the store owner of a woman's fine dress shop. They ask the question "When was the last time someone really asked you if you were satisfied?"

There is not one simple answer that ensures the best results. If you are doing custom software, the way you would get my honest opinion and significant information is to call or to ask.

If the software is off the shelf, call after the person has had a chance to use it. We have a couple of software products that have been significantly improved by us calling the customer direct and asking for information on what they didn't like. Even when an evaluation unit is returned we make a quick call and ask what they didn't like or why they chose a different package. We track all of the information in a package we developed for ourselves for turning client and customer feedback into continuous improvement projects.

If the software is custom listen to the comments being made as you train the people on the software. Their input and off hand comments can be the source of great pieces of information. We use that information for our traiing classes and implementation services.

By the way, this should be of interest to Charlie: there are only three people in our company and we have a fully documented ISO compliant quality system. But it isn't enough for us to stay the same. We want to continuously improve. We also gave some of our procedure catchy names to help us remember what they are for. Our non conforming procedure is our OOPS! procedure which stands for out of process specifications, our preventive action is POWER: Prevent out of Whack Error Results! and ACT: Act Continuously Toward improvement. While acronyms are not always looked upon with the best of favor it is easy for us to say that needs an ACT or OOPS when a client or customer has a complaint or makes a suggestion or we have an idea that may need some brain storming.

Sorry for the slight side track but we use a combination of feedback forms for both services and products. In addition we have records we keep of the verbal information we get by phone and at client sites. We also have a person who will make calls for us about once a year to our existing clients and obtains a third party opinion of our services for us.

Utilize every avenue you can get to help your business and that will more than take care of what you need for ISO.

Phyllis at Pnaish@aol.com

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Howard Atkins
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posted 14 June 1999 01:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Howard Atkins   Click Here to Email Howard Atkins     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I base my customer satisfaction on visits, As quality Manager I try to visit all my customers at least once a year and keep in touch with them. These meetings usually enable me to find out problems that are small and nigardly but cause some sort of dissatisfaction. The fact that I am the quality manager means that I can meet people without entering into negotiations etc. This provides a more overall picture and also gives the customer an adress of last accord.
I always manage to find some aspect that needs to be improved and most customers appreciate the visit as an "extra in the quality service"

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ALM
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posted 16 June 1999 12:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ALM   Click Here to Email ALM     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
We measure customer satisfaction primarily through the use of surveys (both paper and personal visits) and the use of what we call "bounceback cards," described in a previous post.

The return that we are currently receiving on the "bounceback cards" (quick bullet-point questions with ratings numbers) is at approximately 11%-15% which is actually unusually high.

The important thing to remember is not simply to collect such data, but to act on it.

ALM

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Marc Smith
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posted 17 February 2001 09:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Marc Smith   Click Here to Email Marc Smith     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
->I base my customer satisfaction on visits, As quality
->Manager I try to visit all my customers at least once a
->year and keep in touch with them.

I've had several clients whose business was based on this type of close 'monitoring' of customers. The closer touch they kept, as one would expect, the lower the number of customer complaints. That 'personal' touch can go a long way! The only problem is it can be expensive and is only feasible for companies with small customer bases. A local phone company, for example, could not afford to send people out to each customer's house for a '...how are we doing..." visit.

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Quality Diva
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posted 19 February 2001 12:56 PM           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In the past we have used a "Customer Satisfaction Form" but have found the return rate pretty low and from the forms which are returned, the info is not particularly useful. We have been considering using a third party phone survey. Our thoughts are if it's a third party, the answers would be more honest, hence useful. Any thoughts on this approach?

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