The Elsmar Cove Business Standards Discussion Forums More Free Files Forum Discussion Thread Post Attachments Listing Elsmar Cove Discussion Forums Main Page
Welcome to what was The Original Cayman Cove Forums!
This thread is carried over and continued in the Current Elsmar Cove Forums

Search the Elsmar Cove!

Wooden Line
This is a "Frozen" Legacy Forum.
Most links on this page do NOT work.
Discussions since 2001 are HERE

Owl Line
The New Elsmar Cove Forums   The New Elsmar Cove Forums
  Statistical Techniques and 6 Sigma
  Process control- Finish product vs toolling

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search

UBBFriend: Email This Page to Someone! next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   Process control- Finish product vs toolling
Ritasalive
Lurker (<10 Posts)

Posts: 2
From:Magog, Quebec, Canada
Registered: Oct 1999

posted 01 October 1999 11:59 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ritasalive   Click Here to Email Ritasalive     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hello,
We are trying to implement process control on our production line and we have a lot of different view of what we should do.
First, brief introduction of the company; We are a rubber molded and/or extruded supplier (QS-9000) for the automotive Industries. Our PPM at customers facilities are less than 100 and we grow fastly (500 employees, 6 plants, 2 technical centers).
Second, we want to keep the system as simple as possible for every one (doing less than what we are doing right now is better!).
Third, we make more than 100 similars products (like sausages, but differents size, shape and ingredient)
In the moment, our opinion on spc is: we want to certified our finish product by certifying the toolling. Exemple: If a die cutter is use to cut our part, the die won't change in the near future( maybe wear a little but not that much), so the length will always be the same over time. Instead of doing continous monitoring (like spc) can we certified (or calibrate) our tooling (those which always do the same kind of job) once a month or once a year and make monitoring of the process once a day or once a week? After that we thing be able to fix the process tolerance with CPK (ex: If the customer tolerance are +/-1, be able to say that the CPK will be higher than 3)

Is this thinking right?



IP: Logged

Batman
Forum Contributor

Posts: 111
From:Kane, PA 16735
Registered:

posted 03 October 1999 10:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Batman   Click Here to Email Batman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If you say that you have identified tooling as the predominant cause of variation, and are trying to control your process by certifying tooling, this likely an acceptable approach.

You can do almost anything to "certify" your product, as long as there is evidence that the product is certifiable. Tooling does change, pressures and temperatures and feed rates can be adjusted, all of which adds to the process variation. As long as you have identified these, know and understand the extent of the variation these changes make, and can prove that all the present process inputs that are responsible for the variation are under control, then certifying the tooling is one way to assure quality.

IP: Logged

Don Winton
Forum Contributor

Posts: 498
From:Tullahoma, TN
Registered:

posted 03 October 1999 11:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Don Winton   Click Here to Email Don Winton     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Batman pretty much covers it. Define the key input variables, define the extent of control over these variables and carry on.

Regards,
Don

------------------
Just the ramblings of an Old Wizard Warrior.

Check Out dWizard's Lair:
*** Dead Link Removed ***


IP: Logged

All times are Eastern Standard Time (USA)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply Hop to:

Contact Us | The Elsmar Cove Home Page

Your Input Into These Forums Is Appreciated! Thanks!


Main Site Search
Y'All Come Back Now, Ya Hear?
Powered by FreeBSD!Made With A Mac!Powered by Apache!