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  FMEA and Control Plans
  Control Plan Detail

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Author Topic:   Control Plan Detail
Willie
unregistered
posted 22 May 2000 09:36 AM           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
a Control Plan should describe all actions necessary including receiving, in-process,out going and periodic requirements to ensure that all process outputs will be in a state of control.
According to myself all controls necessary to ensure the successfull execution of a Process Function or Operation should be included in Control Plans.

A Colleague tends to differ from me...according to him you only need to identify key product characteristics and their related key process issues in a Control Plan and forget about all other issues such as incoming inspection of material, storage, packaging or movement of product. This implicate that a process with no final product characteristics will for example not need any control actions in the Control Plan.
According to him the incoming inspection system will for example take care of incoming inspection requirements and the 10 other systems will take care of the other aspects.....it is therefore not necessary to incude these in the Control Plan.

I do not agree with his approach.

Question ...will his approach be acceptable and be regarded as compliant to the requirements of QS 9000 or not ??.

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Laura M
Forum Contributor

Posts: 299
From:Rochester, NY US
Registered: Aug 1999

posted 22 May 2000 10:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Laura M   Click Here to Email Laura M     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Dock to Dock PCP's were recommended by our registrar (when I worked for a large company), but I don't think its that cut and dry. Most receiving Inspection controls just referred to the appropriate receiving procedures. When you start looking at failure modes (PFMEA) that can happen in transit from dock to assembly line, etc, in some cases you may prevent defects from getting through your process.
We definately included more than KPC's, however, I do think the APQP manual is vague in this regard. Others?

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Marc Smith
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From:West Chester, OH, USA
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posted 22 May 2000 09:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Marc Smith   Click Here to Email Marc Smith     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Typically a control plan contains customer defined Key Product Characteristics as a minimum, plus any characteristics you decide are important or critical to your process(es) or the product.

The question becomes how far do you go. Your customer may specify 4 Key (or Critical or Special - different companies call them different things) Characteristics. Typically these are defined on the print. Ford uses the infamous 'inverted delta', for example, to identify 'critical' characteristics.

Now it's your turn. You look at areas such as receiving, etc. through delivery. What do you think is critical? You should have input from an FMEA to help you determine your critical characteristics. As is always the case, you're looking at risk factors with your FMEA.

'Legally', your colleague is right saying: "...you only need to identify key product characteristics and their related key process issues in a Control Plan..." However, related key process characteristics may include aspects of everything from receiving to delivery.

"...This implicate that a process with no final product characteristics will for example not need any control actions in the Control Plan..." True - but try to convince an auditor that there are no key characteristics at all. I have seen plenty of products with no customer defined Key Characteristics at all (less so now than 5 years ago because of QS). I have not (in some years) seen a product with no control plan entries.

What receiving does is, in fact, a result of a determination of your identified key characteristics. You may not be thinking of it in the sense of a control plan, but you have receiving requirements for materials and such (including items which go into the product as well as items used to process the product) which have the same basic elements. Sample size, reaction plan, etc. For all intents and purposes receiving does have a control plan. Even in the case of 'ship to stock'.

Your colleague is focusing only on his part of the pie, maybe?

A good question to ask here is: Do you have a Receiving FMEA?

"...and the 10 other systems will take care of the other aspects..." What are the 10 other systems?

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Marc Smith
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From:West Chester, OH, USA
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posted 30 May 2000 12:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Marc Smith   Click Here to Email Marc Smith     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Please replace the wording "Key Product Characteristics" in my posting of 22/5 with "Customer defined Key Product Characteristics"

I will appreciate more comments.
Thanks to Marc and Laura

Willie

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